FALL 2014 COUTURE Chanel

Chanel fall 2014 Couture 1 Chanel fall 2014 Couture 2 Chanel fall 2014 Couture 3 Chanel fall 2014 Couture 4 Chanel fall 2014 Couture 5 Chanel fall 2014 Couture 6 Chanel fall 2014 Couture 7 Chanel fall 2014 Couture 8 Chanel fall 2014 Couture 9 Chanel fall 2014 Couture 10 Chanel fall 2014 Couture 11 Chanel fall 2014 Couture 12 Chanel fall 2014 Couture 13 Chanel fall 2014 Couture 14 Chanel fall 2014 Couture 15 Chanel fall 2014 Couture 16 Chanel fall 2014 Couture 18 Chanel fall 2014 Couture 19 Chanel fall 2014 Couture 20 Chanel fall 2014 Couture 17 Chanel fall 2014 Couture 21 Chanel fall 2014 Couture 23 Chanel fall 2014 Couture 24 Chanel fall 2014 Couture 25 Chanel fall 2014 Couture 26 Chanel fall 2014 Couture 27 Chanel fall 2014 Couture 28 Chanel fall 2014 Couture 29 Chanel fall 2014 Couture 30 Chanel fall 2014 Couture 31 Chanel fall 2014 Couture 32 Chanel fall 2014 Couture 33 Chanel fall 2014 Couture 34 Chanel fall 2014 Couture 35 Chanel fall 2014 Couture 36 Chanel fall 2014 Couture 37 Chanel fall 2014 Couture 38 Chanel fall 2014 Couture 39 Chanel fall 2014 Couture 40 Chanel fall 2014 Couture 41 Chanel fall 2014 Couture 42 Chanel fall 2014 Couture 43 Chanel fall 2014 Couture 44 Chanel fall 2014 Couture 45 Chanel fall 2014 Couture 46 Chanel fall 2014 Couture 47 Chanel fall 2014 Couture 48 Chanel fall 2014 Couture 49 Chanel fall 2014 Couture 50

 A huge terrace with a fireplace-it has always been in Karl Lagerfild’s mind as a beautiful idea, ever since he saw photos of the visionary architect Le Corbusier’s long-Gone Paris apartment. “I just never found a place to do it,” He said after the Chanel show today. Until now, of course, when the gigantic forest planting, iceberg-importing, supermarket-building extravaganzas of Chanel shows past were scaled down to mimic the stark geometry of Corbu’s designs. At either end of the catwalk were huge fireplaces stoked with digital flames. Above the mantel, A big old baroque mirror. Brutalist and baroque: A typically provocative union from a designer who skates across time like fashion’s answer to Doctor Who.

But it wasn’t simply with the setting that lagerfeld indulged his long-cherished dream. Le Corbusier was the architect who made concrete a staple of modern design. So Lagerfeld made concrete the foundation of his collection. Concrete! In Haute Couture! When you turn it into tiny tiles, it becomes a beautiful mosaic. Who knew? Lagerfeld delightedly demonstrated the material’s unexpected lightness by dangling a string of concrete beads under the noses of journalists. “Tongue in chic,” he crowed. “Very chic.”

That twistedness  was the key to the collection. The word couture implies cutting and seaming. There was none of that here. Everything was molded rather than seamed. “It’s Haute Couture without the Couture,” said Lagerfeld, tongue firmly in cheek. And yet there was look after look of a gorgeousness so exquisite it could only be achieved in ateliers that were accustomed to confronting the impossible-and mastering it. It must help that Largerfeld always has the future in mind as he cherry-picks his way through the past. Take lace and coat it with silicone. Think pink, but think plastic, too. Tatter, shred, disrespect…and make something new. That was all in the keeping with the much-touted youth-ifying of Couture. Sam Mcknight’s hair and Maison Michel’s little hats perched pertly on the back of the models’s heads had the effect of a Haircut 100 cover from The Face circa 1982. The effect was compounded by lagerfeld building his silhouette on shorts. There were coatdresses over shorts, jackets and skirts over shorts, plus the perfect shoes for shorts-sandals. Given the molded, sculpted nature of the clothes, Lagerfeld like the ease of a flat. “The models can walk in those dresses like they’re nothing,” he said.

The show closed with a passage of long, chalk-white, almost penitent gowns, lavished with embroidery. The combination now only embodied the brutalist/baroque twinning of Lagerfeld’s inspiration, it also echoed the duality of Coco Chanel’s own life, the austerity of her professional self countered by the exotic orientalism of Coco at home. It made for a stunning contrast, matched only by the final foxtrot of Karl and his seven-months-pregnant bride, the Kiwi model Ashleigh Good. “I like pregnant women,” he said, In keeping with his new cat-loving, godfather-ing public persona. “She looks so elegant, so noble.”

July 08, 2014, Paris

by Tim Blanks – style.com

 

 

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About thelivingfashion

I love fashion and travel!!
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